Literary Examination: Knowledge Being a Force

Martha Shelley's Frankenstein brings out an extremely prominent and unavoidable topic: the dangers of knowledge. It is often stated that there is nothing wrong with learning new things, nevertheless Shelley helps it be a point to prove that wrong. Dr . Frankenstein's voracious and successful method to necromancy shows that very distinctly. Though the new does not clearly state that you will find things best left to higher power, the new does focus on, very pointedly, that a person should become such, and should not affect either that which he is not really meant to, or perhaps that which opposes the natural way of things. Doctor Frankenstein will both. It is not a matter of controversy that humans are not meant to play God, and reanimating a corpse constructed from the remains of various various other corpses declines very strongly in the realm of actions classifiable as the two unethical and unnatural. Properly, the entire book may be paraphrased, as " Dr . Frankenstein was a properly cheerful student, until this individual played God, following which, his whole life crashed about him, and he misplaced virtually everyone and everything he liked. ” Shelley does not explicitly state that you will find things entirely in the realm of God, however the books can make it clear nonetheless that some things were made to transcend man knowledge, and that violating this kind of law could have natural and terrible implications. Shelley desires, then, to paint know-how as a strong force that should be approached with intense extreme caution. Her Frankenstein is a alert.

Three of the visible characters in the novel Frankenstein, Victor Frankenstein, Robert Walton and the huge, all reveal a being thirsty for knowledge that ultimately contributes to downfall in a single way yet another. Shelly, in her story, portrayed how Victor's trip to seek knowledge led to a life of misery and sadness. Possibly upon meeting Walton, Victor says, " You seek for knowledge and wisdom, as I once did; and I ardently hope that the...